9/56 YEAR CYCLE: EARTHQUAKES & VOLCANOES

 

 

 

 

 

 

David McMinn

 

 

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Several papers for your interest

 

9/56 Year Cycle: Californian Earthquakes

Californian Earthquake Cycles

 

9/56 Year Cycle: Earthquakes in the Pacific Rim of South America

 

Indian Earthquake Cycles

 

9/56 Year Cycle: Alaskan Volcanic Eruptions

 




The following paper gives a good coverage of the 9/56 Year effect

Original reference:
McMinn, D.
2011. 9/56 Year Cycle: Earthquakes in Selected Countries. New Concepts in Global Tectonics Newsletter.
Issue 60. p 9-37. September.

 

 

 


9/56 YEAR CYCLE: EARTHQUAKES IN SELECTED COUNTRIES

David McMinn



Abstract. A 9/56 year cycle has been established in the timing of major earthquakes in California – Nevada – Baja California (McMinn, 2011a). It was hypothesized that this cycle should also appear in the seismic catalogs from around the world. Surprisingly, this could be achieved for many countries such as Argentina, Australia, Chile, France, Iceland, New Zealand and so forth. However, the assessment was not completely successful, as a 9/56 year effect could not be determined for the UK, Turkey, Japan and Kamchatka (Russia). Hypothetically, a 9/56 year seismic effect should apply worldwide, but with major variation in patterning from region to region. This proposition could not be fully supported, given the observed anomalies. Hawaiian tsunamis were also considered in relation to the 9/56 year seismic grids for Chile and Alaska. Finally, the beginning of volcanic eruptions on Hawaii could be correlated with 9/56 year and 36/56 year cycles.

 

Keywords: earthquake, 9/56 year, cycle, seismic, tsunami

 

Introduction

A 9/56 year cycle was deciphered in patterns of major historic earthquakes in California – Nevada – Baja California, as well as in Hawaii (McMinn, 2011a). The obvious question arises as to whether this cycle was evident in other regions of the world. Or did it only apply to this portion of the Earth’s surface for some peculiar reason? Historical earthquake catalogs were assessed for a possible 9/56 year effect in various countries – New Zealand, Iceland, Japan, Australia, Chile, Argentina, France, UK, Japan and so forth. It was proposed that a 9/56 year cycle should show up in all countries, but with major variations in the 9/56 year grids. On assessment, the 9/56 year effect did arise in the catalogs of most countries, although there were several exceptions. Tsunamis and eruptions on Hawaii were also considered in relation to the 9/56 year grid.

 

The 9/56 year cycle consists of a grid with 56 year intervals in the vertical columns and 9 year intervals on the horizontal rows. The vertical intervals of 56 years have been called sequences and the 9 year intervals on the horizontal sub-cycles. The numbering adopted in this paper the 56 year sequences was based on that by McMinn (Appendix 2, 2002), in which 1817, 1873, 1929, 1985 was denoted as Sequence 01; 1818, 1874, 1930, 1986 as Sequence 02 and so forth. 

 

According to McMinn (2011a), the 9/56 year effect was caused by Moon-Sun tidal effects. Any events clustering in a 9/56 year pattern will always have the lunar ascending node sited in two segments on the ecliptic approximately 180 degrees opposite with no exceptions. Apogee will also be located in three ecliptical segments 120 degrees apart with no exceptions. How this tidal triggering actually functions remains completely unknown. Please refer to McMinn (2011a) for background information on this Moon-Sun effect.

 

Chile
A comprehensive listing of major Chilean earthquakes (M =>7.8) between 1800 and 2010 was sourced from the Universidad de Chile (see Appendix 1). Of the total 25 earthquakes, 13 appeared in the year beginning April 1 of those years in Table 1 (significant p < .01). All top five events (M => 8.4) since 1850 occurred in this table.

 

Importantly, the 9/56 year seismic pattern for Chile was markedly different to that established for Argentina (see subsequently). Given their close geographic proximity, the 9/56 year seismic grids in both countries could have been expected to align closely, but this was not observed.

 

Table 1
9/56 YEAR CYCLE: CHILEAN QUAKES 1800-2010 M => 7.8
Year beginning April 1

 Sq
25

 Sq
34

Sq
43 

Sq
52

Sq
05

 Sq
14

Sq
23 

Sq
32

Sq
41

Sq
50

Sq
03

Sq
12

Sq
21

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1801

1810

1819
0411

1828

1837
1107

 

 

1803

1812

1821

183 

1839

1848

1857

1866

1875

1884

1893

1841

1850

1859

1868
0813

1877
0509
1878
0123

1886 

1895 

1904

1913
1914
0129

1922
1110

1931

1940

1949
1217
1949
1217

1897

1906
0816

1915

1924

1933

1942

1951

1960
0522

1969

1978

1987 

1996

2005
0506

1953

1962

1971

1980

1989

1998

2007

2014 

 

 

 

 

 

2009
2010
0228

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

Dates expressed as YYYYMMDD.
Years in bold contained major Chilean quakes (M => 7.8) in the year commencing April 1 of those years in the table.
Source of Earthquake Data
: Universidad de Chile, Depto de Geofisica. Servicio Sismologico. http://www.sismologia.cl/seismo.html

 

Argentina
The Instituto Nacional De Prevencion Sismica listed some 57 Argentine (M =>5.0) earthquakes occurring between 1780 and 1995 (see Appendix 2). Of this figure, 32 took place in the year beginning January 20 of those years in Appendix 3 (significant p < 10-4). Of the 35 larger quakes (M => 6.0), 20 showed up in Appendix 3 (significant p < .001). A seasonal trend in the timing of these events could not be detected.

 

Australia
Catalogs of major Australian earthquakes were sourced from the
University of Western Australia. These were combined to give 31 major events (M => 6.0) for the 1870-2010 period (see Appendix 4), of which 14 appeared in the 9/56 year grid presented in Table 2 (significant p < .01). The left hand side of Table 2 experienced 9 earthquakes in the 6 months ended June 20, with one anomaly (Sep 19, 1885). On the right had side, all four events happened in the 6 months beginning June 20.

 

Remarkably, Table 2 accounted for 20% of the complete 9/56 year grid, yet contained:
*          47% of all Australian quakes (M => 6.0).
*          58% of all major Australian quakes (M => 6.4).
Four major episodes were experienced in 1884 alone, while Sequence 12 contained 7 major Australian quakes (M => 6.3) in the 13 months beginning July 12 or about 33% of the total number.

  

Significance was associated with the more extreme events in Australian history. Of the 20 earthquakes with a magnitude => 5.9 and =< 6.3, only five fell in Table 2, which could have been expected by chance.

Table 2
9/56 YEAR CYCLE: AUSTRALIAN QUAKES 1870-2010 M => 6.0
Year beginning July 1

Sq
41

Sq
50

Sq
03

Sq
12

Sq
21

 Sq
30

Sq
39

Sq
48

Sq
01

Sq
10

Sq
19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1873
Dec15

1882

1891
1892
Jun26

 

 

1875

1884
Jul13
1884
Sep19
1885
Jan05
1885
May12

1893

1902
Sep19

1911

1920

1929
Aug16

1938

1947

1913

1922

1931

1940
1941
Apr29
1941
Jun27

1949

1958

1967

1976

1985

 1994

2003 

1969
1970
Mar24
1970
Mar25

1978
1979
Jun02

1987
1988
Jan22

1996
(a)

 2005

  

   

  

  

 

 

Events in bold denote the biggest Australian earthquakes (M => 6.0).
(a) An earthquake occurred on August 10, 1997 (M 6.3) at Collier Bay, Western Australia.
Source of Earthquake Data:
University of Western Australia



New Zealand
GNS Science presented a map of New Zealand’s major earthquakes (M => 6.8) from 1840 to 2010, giving ‘notable shallow (generally less than 30 kms deep) earthquakes since 1848’ (see Appendix 5). Of the 21 episodes, 12 fell in the calendar years of the 9/56 year grid presented in Table 3 (significant p < .01). Importantly, 13 major New Zealand earthquakes happened in the 1840-1950 era, of which 10 appeared in Table 3, compared with an expected 3.3.

 

On the left hand side of Table 3, all 6 quakes took place in the 6 months beginning June 20. On the right hand side, five events happened in the 1.7 months ended March 10, with one anomaly (Jun 17, 1929).

 

Table 3
9/56 YEAR CYCLE: NEW ZEALAND QUAKES 1840-2010 M => 6.8
Year commencing January 1

Sq
52

Sq
05

Sq
14

Sq
23

Sq
32

Sq
41

Sq
50

Sq
03

Sq
12

Sq
21

Sq
30

Sq
39

Sq
48

Sq
01

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1846

1855
0123

1864

1873

 

 

 

 

1848
1016

1857

1866

1875

1884

1893
0212

1902

1911

1920

1929
0309
1929
0617

1868
1019

1877

1886

1895

1904

1913

1922

1931
0202
1931
0213

1940

1949

1958

1967

1976

1985

1924

1933

1942
0624
1942
0802

1951

1960

1969

1978

1987

1996

2005

 

 

 

 

1980

1989

1998

2007
0930
2007
1220

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dates expressed as YYYYMMDD.
Years in bold contained major NZ earthquakes in the year commencing January 1. 
Source of Earthquake Data: GNS Science.


Significance could also be achieved via an 18/56 year grid shown in Table 4. Nine major New Zealand earthquakes happened within this table, in contrast to an expected 2.6.

Table 4
18/56 YEAR CYCLE: NEW ZEALAND QUAKES 1840–2009 (M =>6.8)
Year beginning January 1

Sq
23

Sq
41

Sq
03

Sq
21

Sq
39

Sq
01

Sq
19

 

  

 

 

1855
Jan23

1873

1891

1839

1857 

1875

1893
Feb12

1911

1929
Mar09
1929
Jun17

1947

1895 

1913

1931
Feb02
1931
Feb13

1949

1967

1985

2003
Aug22 

1951

1969

1987

 2005

   

   

 

 2007
Sep30
2007
Dec20

  

  

  

  

  

 

The 56 year sequences are separated by an interval of 18 years.
Years in bold contained major NZ earthquakes in the year commencing January 1.
Source of Earthquake Data: GNS Science.


France
           
SISMALP – French Alps Seismic Network released a comprehensive listing of “historical quakes which have occurred in south-east (France) and the areas bordering on Switzerland and Italy for which the maximum intensity reached or exceeded VII” (see Appendix 6). For the period to 1750 to 2000, SISMALP gave some 61 earthquakes for the south east region, with 28 falling in the 9/56 year pattern presented in Appendix 7 (significant p < .001). Strangely, 13 events happened in only five sequences (see Table 5), of which 6 occurred in July and five between March 10 and April 20. Two anomalies took place in late 1855.           

 

Table 5
9/56 YEAR CYCLE:
QUAKES IN SOUTH EAST FRANCE 1750–2000
Year beginning January 1

Sq 30

 

Sq 39

 

Sq 48

 

Sq 01

 

Sq 10

 

 

 

 

1752

+ 9

1761

+ 9

1770

1790

+ 9

1799

+ 9

1808
Apr02
Apr02
Apr16

+ 9

1817
Mar11

+ 9

1826

1846

+ 9

1855
Jul25
Jul26
Jul26

Oct28
Dec12

+ 9

1864

+ 9

1873
Jul14
Jul19

+ 9

1882

1902

+ 9

1911

+ 9

1920

+ 9

1929

+ 9

1938
Jul18

1958
Mar30

+ 9

1967

+ 9

1976

+ 9

1985

+ 9

1994

Source of Earthquake Data: SISMALP.

 

Iceland
The Icelandic Meteorological Office published a listing of 25 major Icelandic earthquakes (M = > 6.0) between 1706 and 2000 (see Appendix 8). Amazingly, none of these events (M => 6.0) took place in the four months beginning September 10. Some 20 Icelandic quakes fell in the 9/56 year grid shown in Appendix 9 (significant p < .001), with 10 in the 4.5 months ended June 5 and 9 in the month ended September 6. The anomaly happened on January 13, 1976.

India
23 major earthquakes were presented in
Earthquake History of India and How safe are we? (see Appendix 10), with 13 occurring the 9/56 year grid shown in Table 6 (significant p < .01). More notably, 10 took place preferentially in the 8 months ended August 30 in the table, whereas the expected frequency was around 2.7. Unfortunately, only limited information was available for pre 1850 Indian quakes.

On the left hand side of Table 6, all four earthquakes happened in the three months to April 4. On the right hand side, 7 quakes happened in the three months ended August 21, with two exceptions (Dec 10, 1967 & Oct 8, 2005).

Table 6
9/56 YEAR CYCLE: INDIAN EARTHQUAKES 1850-2010
Year ended August 30

Sq
53

Sq
06

Sq

15

Sq
24

Sq
33

Sq
42

Sq
51

Sq
04

Sq
13

Sq
22

Sq
31

Sq
40

Sq
49

Sq

02

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1856

1865

1874

 

 

 

 

 

1858

1867

1876

1885
0530

1894

1903

1912

1921

1930
0702

1869
0110

1878

1887

1896

1905
0404

1914

1923

1932

1941
0626

1950
0815

1959

1968
1967
1210

1977

1986

1925

1934
0115

1943

1952

1961

1970

1979

1988
0806
1988
0821

1997
0522

2006
2005
1008

 

 

 

 

1981

1990

1999
0329

2008

2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dates expressed as YYYYMMDD.
Major Indian quakes in bold occurred in the years ended August 30. 
Source of Earthquake Data
: 
Earthquake History of India

 

Italy
Instituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia provided a comprehensive catalog of historic Italian quakes, which yielded a listing of 35 events with a magnitude => 6.00 since 1750 (see Appendix 11). A clustering effect within the complete 9/56 year grid could not be detected at the p < .01 level. However, only three events were experienced in the 9/56 grid as presented in Appendix 12, which comprised 34% of the complete 9/56 year grid, yet contained only 9% of all major earthquakes.

Taiwan
The Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan (pers com) kindly provided a listing of the 39 major Taiwanese earthquakes (M => 7.0) occurring between 1900 and 2004 (see Appendix 13). These episodes did not group into a 9/56 year pattern with significance at the p < .01 level. Even so, very few Taiwanese events took place in the 9/56 year grid between the Sequences 46 to 29 (see Appendix 14). In fact, only 7 quakes happened in the 24 sequences in this sector, where as about 17 could have been anticipated by chance (significant p < .01).

Alaska, USA
The US Geological Survey presented a listing of 25 major Alaskan earthquakes (M => 7.5) from 1898 to 2010 (see Appendix 15). Some 13 fell in the 9/56 year pattern given in Table 7 (significant p < .01). Of the top 7 episodes (M => 8.0), 6 appeared in the table compared with an expected 1.5.

 

Table 7
9/56 YEAR CYCLE: ALASKAN EARTHQUAKES 1898-2010 M => 7.5
Year ended November 5

Sq
02

Sq
11

Sq
20

Sq
29

Sq
38

Sq
47

Sq
56

Sq
09

Sq
18

Sq
27

Sq
36

Sq
45

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1899
0904
1899
0910

1908

1917
0531

 

 

1892

1901

1910

1919

1928

1937

1946
0401

1955

1964
0324

1973

1930
1929
1217

1939
1938
1110

1948
0514

1957
0309

1966

1975
0202

1984

1993

2002
1103

2011

 

 

1986
0507

1995

2004
2003
1217

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dates expressed as YYYYMMDD.
Each 56 year sequence is separated by an interval of 9 years.
Events (M =>7.5) in bold occurred in the 12 months ended November 5.
Source of Raw Data: 
US Geological Survey. Earthquakes in the United States. Magnitude 7.0 and Greater. http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/states/large_usa_7.php

 

Anomalies
A 9/56 year cycle could not be established for some countries at the p < .01 level, something that applied to Japan, the UK, Turkey and Kamchatka (Russia). A 9/56 year effect was expected to be established for all countries and regions, but with varying 9/56 year configurations. The anomalies did not support this proposition.

 

 

Parkfield Earthquakes        

The Parkfield earthquakes in California were the most famous seismic cycle in US history. The first happened on January 9, 1857, with subsequent quakes taking place increasingly later in the solar year - February 2, March 3, March 10, June 8, June 28, with the last event on September 28. The quakes also occurred at a reasonably regular interval of 20 to 24 years between 1857, 1881, 1901 & 1922, while 1966 was some 2 x 22 years after the 1922 event (see Table 8). The 1934 and 2004 episodes deviated radically from the ideal 20 to 24 year periodicity. NB. Degrees on the ecliptical circle have been denoted as E°, while angular degrees between the Moon and Sun (lunar phase) have been given as A°. This was to distinguish between two very different concepts.

 

Table 8
PARKFIELD EARTHQUAKES & MOON-SUN DATA

Date

M

UT

Sun
E
°

Moon
E
°

Phase
A
°

AN
E
°

Apo
E
°

Jan 09, 1857

7.9

16.00

289

100

171

010

206

Feb 02, 1881

5.8

00.11

313

354

041

265

105

Mar 03, 1901

6.4

07.45

342

139

157

237

202

Mar 10, 1922

6.3

11.21

349

127

138

190

337

Jun 08, 1934

6.0

04.47

077

032

315

313

116

Jun 27, 1966

6.0

04.26

095

206

111

053

340

Sep 28, 2004

6.0

17.15

186

008

182

033

096

Abbreviations: AN – Ascending node. Apo – Apogee point.

 

Five Parkfield events happened in one sector of the complete 9/56 year cycle (see Table 9), where as chance would indicate about 0.9. All five episodes also had lunar phase from 110 to 185 A°. Two earthquakes took place with phase outside this range – February 2, 1881 (041 A°) and June 8, 1934 (315 A°).

 

Table 9
THE 9/56 YEAR CYCLE:
PARKFIELD EARTHQUAKES & LUNAR PHASE
12.3 months ending March 10

Sq
41

Sq
50

Sq
03

Sq
12

Sq
21

Sq
30

Sq
39

 

 

 

 

 

 

1855

1857
Jan09
171 A°

1866

1875

1884

1893

1902
1901
Mar03
157 A°

1911

1913

1922
Mar10
138 A°

1931

1940

1949

1958

1967
1966
Jun27
111 A°

1969

1978

1987

1996

2005
2004
Sep28
182 A°

2014

 

 

44 - 65 Year Grid appeared between four Parkfield earthquakes (1857, 1901, 1922 & 1966) and was based on intervals of about 44 and 65 solar years (see Table 10). Lunar phase for the four quakes ranged from 110 to 175 Ao, while the ecliptical position of apogee happened at 206 Eo (1857) and 202 Eo (1901), as well as at 337 Eo (1922) and 340 Eo (1966). The three Parkfield earthquakes outside this grid had apogee located from 095 to 120 E°.

 

Overall, the findings on the Parkfield series were only ‘interesting’, as the sample size was too tiny to draw any conclusions. The author looked at the prospect of seismic grids, but nothing very precise could be produced. In contrast, financial grids can be very exacting, with a few examples being presented in Appendix 21.

Table 10
PARKFIELD QUAKES & THE 44/65 YEAR GRID

Solar Year Intervals

Jan 9, 1857

+ 65.16

Mar 10, 1922

+ 44.14

 

+ 44.30

Mar 03, 1901

+ 65.32

Jun 27, 1966

Synodic Month Intervals & Lunar Phase

Jan 9, 1857
171 Ao

+ 805.94

Mar 10, 1922
138 Ao

+ 545.96

 

+ 547.90

Mar 03, 1901
157 Ao

+ 807.87

Jun 27, 1966
111 Eo

Apogee Eo

Jan 9, 1857
206 Eo

+ 131°

Mar 10, 1922
337 Eo

- 004o

 

+ 003o

Mar 03, 1901
202 Eo

+ 138°

Jun 27, 1966

340 Eo

Ascending Node Eo

Jan 09, 1857
010 Eo

+ 180°

Mar 10, 1922
190 Eo

+ 227o

 

+ 223o

Mar 03, 1901
237 Eo

+ 176°

Jun 27, 1966

053 Eo

 

 

Hawaiian Tsunamis

Tsunamis striking the Hawaiian coast (run up => 1 metre) over the past two centuries could not be correlated with the 9/56 year grid at the p < .01 level, based on data from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC). However, 13 Chilean quakes were listed as causing tsunamis in Hawaii (see Appendix 16), of which 9 appeared in Table 1 - a 9/56 year pattern containing numerous major Chilean events. Similarly, many Hawaiian tsunamis from Alaskan sources showed up in Table 7, a grid accounting for various major Alaskan episodes.

 

The 9/56 year seismic layouts for Chile and Alaska were very different, which may help explain why the full listing of Hawaiian tsunamis failed to produce 9/56 year correlates. Furthermore, a 9/56 year seismic grid could not be established for Japan or Kamchatka and thus no 9/56 year pattern was discernable for Hawaiian tsunamis generated from these sources.

Lander & Lockridge (1989) produced a catalog of 26 Hawaiian tsunamis (run up => 1 metre) for the period 1815 - 1975 (see Appendix 17). Of this total, 12 fell in the 9/56 year grid as shown in Table 11, a finding that was significant (p < .01). There were 8 tsunamis originating from earthquakes in Chile, of which 7 occurred in Table 1.

 

 

Table 11
9/56 YEAR CYCLE: HAWAIIAN TSUNAMIS 1810-1975 run up > 1m
Year beginning March 1

 Sq
34

 Sq
43

Sq
52

Sq
05

Sq
14

 Sq
23

Sq
32

Sq
41

Sq
50

Sq
03

Sq
12

Sq
21

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1810

1819
0412

1828

1837
1107

 

 

1812

1821

1830

1839

1848

1857

1866

1875

1884

1893

1850

1859

1868
0403
1868
0813
1868

1002

1877
0510
1878
0120

1886

1895

1904

1913

1922
1111
1923
0202

1931

1940

1949

1906
0817

1915

1924

1933
0302

1942

1951

1960
0522

1969

 

 

 

 

1962

1971

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dates given as YYYYMMDD.

Hawaiian tsunamis highlighted in bold fall in the year beginning March 1.
Source of Raw Data: After Lander & Lockridge (1989).

 

The 18/56 year grid in Table 12 contained 50% of all NDGC listed tsunamis (run up => 1 metre) generated from Hawaiian sources.

 

Table 12
18/56 YEAR CYCLE:
HAWAIIAN TSUNAMIS GENERATED FROM LOCAL QUAKES
8 months ending May 30

Sq 52

Sq 14

Sq 32

Sq 50

Sq 12

Sq 30

Sq 48

 

 

 

 

 

 

1864

 

 

 

1866

1884

1902

1920
1919
Oct02

1868
Apr02

1886

1904
1903
Nov29

1922

1940

1958

1976
1975
Nov29

1924
May30

1942

1960

1978

 

 

 

1980

1998

2016

1989

 

 

 

The 56 year sequences are each separated by an interval of 18 years.
Years in bold contained major Hawaiian tsunamis (run up => 1.0 m) in the 8 months ended May 30.

Source of Tsunami Raw Data: NGDC.

 

Hawaiian Volcanoes
The beginnings of Kilauea and Mauna Loa eruptions have been well documented by the US Geological Survey (see Appendices 18 & 19 respectively). For the 58 eruptions by the Kilauea volcano since 1823, 23 commenced in the 9/56 year grid as presented in Table 13. Mauna Loa recorded 33 episodes since 1843, of which 11 happened in the table. Combining these two sets of data gave 34 eruptive beginnings, which was significant p < .01. It would have been curious to see if the maximum intensity of Hawaiian eruptions could have been linked to the 9/56 year grid. Alas, such raw data was not available.

 

Table 13
9/56 YEAR CYCLE: HAWAIIAN ERUPTIONS 1820 – 2010
Year ending July 31

Sq

52

Sq 05

Sq
14

Sq
23

Sq 32

Sq 41

Sq 50

Sq 03

Sq 12

Sq 21

Sq
30

Sq
39

Sq 48

Sq 01

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1828

1837

1846

1855

1864

1873
#

 

1821

1830

1839

1848

1857

1866
#

1875

1884
*

1893
#

1902

1911

1920
*#

1929
**

1868
**#

1877
**#

1886

1895

1904
##

1913

1922
*

1931
*

1940
#

1949
#

1958

1967

1976
*

1985

1924
***

1933

1942
#

1951

1960
**

1969
****

1978
*

1987

1996

2005

 

 

 

 

1980
*

1989

1998

2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Denoted the beginning of a Kilauea eruption.                                                                    
# Denotes the beginning of a Mauna Lao eruption.

Dates given as YYYYMMDD.
The 56 year sequences are separated by an interval of 9 years.

Years in bold contained the beginning of Hawaiian eruptions in the year ending July 31.
Source of Raw Data: US Geological Survey.

           
Much higher significance was achieved via 36/56 year grids. Kilauea and Mauna Loa experienced 28 eruptive beginnings within the 36 year sub-cycles in Grids 1 & 2 (significant p < 10-5) (see Table 14). Grid 2 was displaced relative to Grid 1 by 9 years (ie: Grid 2 plus 9 years gives Grid 1) and thus may be amalgamated into a grid repeating the 9, 27, 9, 27…. years on the horizontal and 56 years on the vertical (denoted as a 9-27/56 year cycle) (see Appendix 20).           

Table 14
36/56 YEAR CYCLES: HAWAIIAN ERUPTIONS 1820 – 2010
Year ending July 31

Grid 1

Sq 05

 

Sq 41

 

Sq 21

 

Sq 01

 

 

 

 

1837

+ 36

1873
#

 

 

1857

+ 36

1893
#

+ 36

1929
**

1877
**#

+ 36

1913

+ 36

1949
#

+ 36

1985

1933

+ 36

1969
****

+ 36

2005

 

 

1989

 

2005

 

 

 

 

Grid 2

Sq 52

 

Sq 32

 

Sq 12

 

Sq 48

 

 

 

 

1828

+ 36

1864

 

 

1848

+ 36

1884
*

+ 36

1920
*#

1868
**#

+ 36

1904
##

+ 36

1940
#

+ 36

1976
*

1924
***

+ 36

1960
**

+ 36

1996

 

 

1980
*

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Denoted the beginning of an eruption at Kilauea.  
# Denotes the beginning of an eruption at Mauna Lao.        
Years presented in bold contained eruptive beginnings in the year ending July 31.
Source of Raw Data: US Geological Survey.

 

Discussion
Good correlates at p < .01 could be established between the 9/56 year grid and the historic earthquake catalogs for many countries. Even so, the outcome was not consistent, as some countries did not show a 9/56 year effect, such as the UK, Japan, Turkey and Kamchatka (Russia). No explanation may be given why some countries failed to yield 9/56 year significance. The 9/56 year grid can be intimately linked to Moon-Sun cycles, a topic extensively covered by McMinn (2010a) so it will not be reiterated here. His paper is recommended reading for those interested in the concept.

Sunspot Cycle. To date a 9/56 year cycle has been established for finance (McMinn, 1993), earthquakes (McMinn, 2011a, 2011b) and hurricanes (McMinn, 2011c) and all three phenomena have been linked to sunspot cycles.           

Krivelyova & Robotti (2003) found that high geomagnetic storm activity induced stock market declines the following week. The outcome was statistically and economically significant. The size of the geomagnetic storm effect was similar within and across countries, ranging between 0.77% and 4.4% of average annual returns. According to the authors, substantially higher stock market returns were recorded during periods of quiet geomagnetic activity.    

Hodges & Elsner (2010) showed that the likelihood of three or more hurricanes hitting the US coast rises from 20% to 40% in years when sunspot activity is in the lowest 25%, compared with years in the highest 25%. During peak sunspot years, there is only a 25% chance of one or more hurricanes hitting the USA, a figure that spikes to 64% in the lowest sunspot years.

For the 1973-2010 period, Choi & Maslov (2010) found that earthquake frequency was “closely related to the solar [sunspot] cycle: the number of earthquakes increases during the declining/trough periods.” The authors also listed numerous additional references on sunspot - earthquake cycles.

The relationship between the 9/56 year Moon-Sun cycle and the sunspot cycle remains very enigmatic.

 

Planetary Cycles. Planetary cycles are quite irregular when viewed from Earth. If the planets did play a major role in earthquake timing, the neat 9/56 year grids found in seismology should not arise. In contrast, Moon-Sun cycles are repeatable, very precise and very closely align with the 9/56 year grid. Additionally, the planets do exert extremely faint tidal influences on the Earth’s surface, that are much, much weaker than the lunisolar tidal effect. It is debatable whether such weak planetary forces are detectable in the noise of seismic activity. Based on research to date, such weak planetary forces cannot be detected in seismic cycles. However, this presumption may still be overturned by new studies. This could possibly be achieved through the analysis of sunspot frequency, which has been directly linked to Jupiter cycles (Wikipedia).

Latitudinal Passage. There may be similarities in earthquake cycles at the same latitude north and south of the equator – something that needs to be appraised. The sunspot cycle offers the best example of latitudinal passage. At the beginning of a new cycle, sunspots mainly occur at about 40o latitude north and south of the solar equator. These sunspots emerge at lower and lower latitudes with increasing activity until the cycle peaks in number at about 15o north and south. This peak wanes as the sunspots move closer to the equator. When activity reaches a minimum, sunspots of the new cycle start forming at the 40o latitudes, while those from the old cycle occur near the equator. Over the whole cycle there is a progressive drift of sunspots from the higher latitudes towards the equator. Latitudinal passage may involve a fundamental principle that could also manifest in terrestrial seismic cycles.

Plate Tectonics. The question may be raised – Are the Moon and Sun influential in determining how continents split and collide? What causes the formation of the African rift valley, the mid Atlantic ridge or the Himalayas on the Earth’s surface? This was pure speculation, but still needed some consideration.

Volcanoes. A 9/56 year eruption cycle could not be confirmed from the work so far undertaken by the author. Only a few favorable 9/56 year correlates could be achieved, based on raw data sourced mainly from the National Geophysical Data Center. Several countries/regions showed a 9/56 year earthquake cycle, but did not yield a similar volcanic cycle. However, the beginnings of eruptions on Hawaii did correlate with the 9/56 and 36/56 year grids in Tables 13 & 14 respectively.

Finally, how the 9/56 year seismic cycle changes over the very long term could also be assessed from catalogs covering centuries of data. Such trends should occur, given the secular changes evident in Moon-Sun cycles.           

Conclusions

A 9/56 year cycle could be established in various countries and regions around the world such as south west North America (McMinn, 2011), Chile, Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, France, Iceland and India. For Italy and Taiwan, large sections of the complete 9/56 year grid contained very few earthquakes, which also yielded significance at p < .01. Quake listings for several US states also showed a 9/56 year influence, but were not included in this paper apart from Alaska. Despite such favourable findings, some catalogs failed to produce a 9/56 year effect at p > .01, an outcome that was apparent for Japan, the UK, Turkey and Kamchatka (Russia). A 9/56 year cycle could be reasonably hypothesized to apply worldwide, but with varying 9/56 year patterning arising from Moon-Sun tidal influences. This was not observed and no explanation can be offered for the failure of some countries to yield a 9/56 year effect.

Hawaiian tsunamis originating from Chile and Alaska may occur preferentially in 9/56 year grids as shown in Tables 1 & 7 respectively. Furthermore, the beginning of Hawaiian volcanic eruptions also took place preferentially in 9/56 year and 36/56 year grids. The prospect of 9/56 year patterns for tsunamis and eruptions has not be researched in much detail by the author and this topic remains to be more fully explored.

The findings of McMinn (2011a & 2011b) and this assessment were generally supportive of a 9/56 year cycle in the timing of major earthquakes around the world. However, current understanding of this phenomenon was extremely limited and much more follow up research was imperative.

References
Alaskan Earthquake Information Center. Alaskan Earthquakes, Active Faults and Rupture Zones. http://giseis.alaska.edu/html_docs/historic_quakes_tectonics.html
Carolan, C., 1998. Autumn Panics. The Market Technician. Journal of the Society of Technical Analysts. p 12-16. July.
GNS Science, Large New Zealand Earthquakes. http://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning/Science-Topics/Earthquakes/New-Zealand-Earthquakes/Where-were-NZs-largest-earthquakes
Choi, D R. & Maslov, L., 2010. Earthquake & Solar Activity Cycles. New Concepts in Global Tectonics Newsletter. No 57. p 85-97. December.
Hodges, R E., & Elsner, J B., 2010. Evidence linking solar variability with US hurricanes. Journal of Climatology.  July 14. DOI: 10.1002/joc.2196.
Icelandic Meteorological Office. Stærri skjálftar (>4) á árunum 1706-1990.
http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/ymislegt/storskjalf.html
Instituto Nacional De Prevencion Sismica,
http://www.inpres.gov.ar/seismology/linkppal.htm
Instituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia.
Catalogo Parametrico dei Terremoti Italiani, CPT104 http://emidius.mi.ingv.it/cpt104/
Krivelyova, A. & Robotti, C., 2003. Playing The Field: Geomagnetic Storms & International Stock Markets. Working Paper 2003-5b. Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
http://www.frbatlanta.org/pubs/wp/working_paper_2003-5b.cfm?redirected=true
Lander J F. & Lockridge, P A., 1989. Tsunami in Hawaii. U.S. Dept. of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 265p.
McMinn, D., 1993. Financial Crises & The Number 56. The Australian Technical Analysts Association Newsletter. p 21-25. September.
McMinn, D., 1995. Financial Crises & The 56 Year Cycle. Twin Palms Publishing. 103p.
McMinn, D., 2002. 9/56 Year Cycle: Financial Crises.
http://www.davidmcminn.com/pages/fcnum56.htm
McMinn, D., 2010. 60 Year Intervals & October Panics. Market Technician. Journal of the Society of Technical Analysts (UK). Issue 67. p 13-15. June.
McMinn, D., 2011a. 9/56 Year Cycle: Californian Earthquakes. New Concepts In Global Tectonics Newsletter. No 58. p 33-44. March.
McMinn, D., 2011b. 9/56 Year Cycle: Record Earthquakes. New Concepts In Global Tectonics Newsletter. No 59. p 88-104. June.
McMinn, D., 2011c. 9/56 Year Cycle: Hurricanes. New Concepts In Global Tectonics Newsletter. No 59. p 105-111. June.
Stover, C W & Coffman, J L., Seismicity of the United States, 1568-1989 (Revised). US Geological Survey Prof. Paper 1527, 1993.
Universidad de Chile, Dept de Geofisica. Sismos Importantes Y/O Destructivos 1570 - Mayo 2005. http://www.sismologia.cl/seismo.html
University of Western Australia. Historical Earthquakes of Western Australia.
http://www.seismicity.see.uwa.edu.au/welcome/seismicity_of_western_australia
University of Western Australia. Seismicity of Australia.
http://www.seismicity.see.uwa.edu.au/welcome/seismicity_in_australia#impotEQ
University of Western Australia. Seismicity of Central Australia
http://www.seismicity.see.uwa.edu.au/welcome/seismicity_in_australia/central_australia

 

 

Appendix 1
CHILEAN EARTHQUAKES 1800-2010 M =>7.8

Date

Time

Latitude

Longitude

Ms

11/04/1819

10:00

-27.35

-70.35

8.3

19/11/1822

22:30

-33.05

-71.60

8.5

08/10/1831

06:00

-

-

7.8

20/02/1835

11:30

-36.83

-73.03

8.5

07/11/1837

08:00

-39.80

-73.20

8.0

13/08/1868

16:45

-18.50

-70.35

8.5

09/05/1877

21:16

-19.60

-70.23

8.5

23/01/1878

08:00

-20.00

-70.30

7.9

16/08/1906

19:48

-33.00

-72.00

7.9

29/01/1914

23:30

-35.00

-73.00

8.2

20/05/1918

12:57

-28.50

-71.50

7.9

04/12/1918

07:47

-

-

8.2

10/11/1922

23:53

-28.50

-70.00

8.4

01/12/1927

00:06

-35.00

-72.00

8.3

25/01/1939

23:32

23.32

72.25

8.3

06/04/1943

12:07

-30.75

-72.00

8.3

02/08/1946

15:19

25.50

70.50

7.9

17/12/1949

02:53

-54.00

-71.00

7.8

17/12/1949

11:07

-54.000

-71.00

7.8

09/12/1950

17:38

23.50

67.50

8.3

22/05/1960

15:11

-39.50

-74.50

8.5

28/12/1966

04:18

-25.51

-70.74

7.8

03/03/1985

19:46

-33.24

-71.85

7.8

06/05/2005

18.44

29.90

69.13

7.8

27/02/2010

12.40

22.31

70.08

8.8

Events in bold fall in year beginning April 1 of those years in Table 1.
Source: Universidad de Chile, Depto de Geofisica. Servicio Sismologico. http://www.sismologia.cl/seismo.html.

 

 

Appendix 2
9/56 YEAR CYCLE: ARGENTINE QUAKES 1780-1995
Year beginning January 20

Year

Month

Day

Lat

Long

M

Int

1782

5

22

33.00

69.20

7.00

VIII

1817

7

4

28.00

64.50

7.00

VIII

1826

1

19

26.20

65.25

6.40

VIII

1844

10

18

24.80

64.70

6.50

VII

1861

3

20

32.90

68.90

7.00

IX

1863

1

14

23.60

65.00

6.40

VIII

1871

10

9

23.10

64.30

6.40

VIII

1874

7

6

23.00

64.20

6.00

VII

1888

6

5

34.60

57.90

5.50

VI

1892

3

21

29.50

65.00

6.00

VII

1894

10

27

29.80

69.00

8.00

IX

1898

2

5

28.45

66.15

6.40

VIII

1899

3

23

22.10

63.80

6.40

VIII

1899

4

12

28.65

68.40

6.40

VIII

1903

8

12

32.10

69.10

6.00

VII

1906

11

17

26.75

65.70

6.00

VII

1907

8

11

27.20

65.50

5.50

VI

1908

2

5

25.20

64.70

6.00

VII

1908

9

22

30.50

64.50

6.50

VII

1913

11

6

26.80

65.10

5.50

VI

1917

7

27

32.30

68.90

6.50

VII

1920

12

17

32.70

68.40

6.00

VIII

1927

4

14

32.00

69.50

7.10

VIII

1929

5

23

32.90

68.90

5.70

VI

1929

5

30

35.00

68.00

6.80

VIII

1930

12

24

24.70

66.30

6.00

VIII

1931

4

3

27.00

65.00

6.30

VII

1933

2

12

26.60

65.35

5.50

VI

1934

6

11

33.50

64.50

6.00

VIII

1936

5

22

32.00

66.00

6.00

VIII

1941

7

3

31.80

67.80

6.20

VII

1944

1

15

31.40

68.40

7.40

IX

1947

1

16

31.10

64.50

5.50

VII

1948

1

21

30.50

58.00

5.50

VI

1948

8

25

24.90

64.80

7.00

IX

1949

12

17

54.00

68.77

7.80

VIII

1952

6

11

31.60

68.60

7.00

VIII

1955

3

28

30.80

45.70

6.90

VI

1957

10

24

28.90

68.00

6.00

VII

1959

5

12

23.18

64.65

6.80

VIII

1966

10

21

27.72

62.34

5.00

VII

1966

11

10

31.95

68.40

5.90

VI

1967

4

25

32.72

69.17

5.40

VI

1968

10

15

26.87

60.88

5.00

VI

1972

9

26

30.90

68.21

5.80

VI

1973

11

3

25.98

67.71

5.80

VI

1973

11

19

24.57

64.58

5.40

VII

1974

8

17

23.30

64.40

5.00

VII

1977

6

7

29.74

67.80

5.10

VII

1977

11

23

31.04

67.76

7.40

IX

1977

12

6

31.23

67.90

5.90

VI

1978

1

17

31.25

67.99

5.70

VI

1981

5

9

26.57

64.89

5.00

VI

1985

1

26

33.12

68.82

5.90

VIII

1992

2

29

26.68

64.93

5.20

VI

1993

6

8

31.56

69.23

6.50

VI

1993

10

30

31.70

68.23

5.90

VI

Argentine quakes denoted in bold happened in the year beginning January 20 of those years in Appendix 3.
Source: Instituto Nacional De Prevencion Sismica

 

 

Appendix 3
9/56 YEAR CYCLE: ARGENTINE QUAKES 1780-1995
Year beginning January 20

Sq
22

Sq
31

Sq
40

Sq
49

Sq
02

 Sq
11

Sq
20

Sq
29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1789

1782
May22

1791

1800

1809

1818

1827

1836

1845

1838

1847

1856

1865

1874
Jul06

1883

1892
Mar21

1901

1894
Oct27

1903
Aug12

1912

1921

1930
Dec24

1939

1948
Jan21
Aug25

1957
Oct24

1950

1959
May12

1968
Oct15

1977
Jun07
Nov23
Dec06
1978
Jan17

1986

1995

2004

 

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq
38

Sq
47

Sq
56

Sq
09

Sq
18

Sq
27

Sq
36

Sq
45

 

 

 

 

 

1787

1796

1805

1798

1807

1816

1825
1926
Jan19

1834

1843

1852

1861
Mar30

1854

1863

1872

1881

1890

1899
Mar23
Apr12

1908
Feb05
Sep22

1917
Jul27

1910

1919

1928

1937

1946
1947
Jan16

1955
Mar28

1964

1973
Nov03
Nov19

1966
Oct21
Nov10

1975

1984

1993
Jun08
Oct30

 2002

2011

 

 

The 56 year sequences are separate from each other by an interval of 9 years.
Years in bold contain major Argentine earthquakes in the year beginning January 20 of those years in the table. 
Source of Earthquake Data:
Instituto Nacional De Prevencion Sismica

 

 

Appendix 4
MAJOR AUSTRALIAN QUAKES 1870-2010  (M => 5.9)

M

Date

Location

7.6

Nov 19, 1906

Indian Ocean offshore WA

7.1

Apr 29, 1941*

Meeberrie, WA

7.1

Dec 12, 2001

Southern Ocean, offshore Albany WA

6.9

Jun 26, 1892*

Offshore Flinders Island, Tas

6.8

May 12, 1885*

Offshore Flinders Island, Tas

6.8

May 10, 1897

Offshore Beachport, SA

6.8

Oct 14, 1968

Meckering, WA

6.8

May 6, 1978

North of Lake Tobin, WA

6.7

Aug 16, 1929*

Offshore Broome, WA

6.7

Mar 24, 1970*

Tobin Lake, WA

6.7 6.5 6.3 (a)

Jan 22, 1988*

Tennant Creek, NT

6.6

Jan 05, 1885*

Offshore Geraldton, WA 

6.5

Jan 05, 1875

Geraldton, WA

6.5

Oct 28, 1937

Simpson Desert, NT

6.5

Jun 27, 1941*

Simpson Desert, NT

6.4

Jul 13, 1884*

Offshore Flinders Island, Tas

6.4

Sep 19, 1884*

Offshore Flinders Island, Tas

6.4

Mar 25, 1970*

Lake Tobin, WA

6.4

Jul 16, 1971

Tobin Lake, WA

6.3

Mar 23, 1964

Derby, WA

6.3

Aug 10, 1997

Collier Bay, WA

6.2

Dec 15, 1873*

Central Australia, WA

6.2

Sep 15, 1946

Offshore Flinders Island, Tas

6.2

Aug 28, 1972

Simpson Desert, NT

6.2

Oct 03, 1975

Tobin Lake, WA

6.2

Feb 19, 1976

North of Exmouth, WA

6.2

Jun 02, 1979*

Cadoux, WA

6.0

Sep 19, 1902*

Warroka, SA

6.0

Jan 13, 1910

Tasman Sea

6.0

Jun 07, 1918

Bundaberg, Qld

6.0

Nov 25, 1983

Tasman Sea

5.9

Aug 28, 1883

Gayndah, Qld

5.9

Nov 27, 1959

Kimberley, WA

5.9

May 19, 1965

Carnarvon, WA

5.9

Nov 13, 1966

WA

5.9

Mar 10, 1970*

Calingiri, WA

5.9

Jun 18, 1973

WA

5.9

Mar 30, 1986*

Marryat Creek, SA

(a) Three quakes occurred on this date, but were treated as one event.
Offshore quakes were included if they happened relatively near the coastline.
Quakes in bold appeared in the year beginning July 1 of those years in Table 2.
Source:
University of Western Australia

 

Appendix 5
MAJOR NEW ZEALAND QUAKES 1840-2010
M => 6.8

Date

M

Location

Jan 23, 1855

8.1

Wairarapa

Jun 17, 1929

7.8

Murchison

Feb 02, 1931

7.8

Hawke's Bay

Jul 15, 2009

7.8

Dusky Sound

Mar 5, 1934

7.6

Pahiatua

Oct 16, 1848

7.5

Marlborough

Feb 23, 1863

7.5

Hawke's Bay

Oct 19, 1868

7.5

Cape Farwell

Sep 01, 1888

7.3

North Canterbury

Sep 30, 2007

7.3

Auckland Islands

Feb 13, 1931

7.3

Hawke's Bay

Jun 24, 1942

7.2

Wairarapa

Nov 23, 2004

7.2

Puysegur Trench

Mar 9, 1929

7.1

Arthur's Pass

May 24, 1968

7.1

Inangahua

Aug 22, 2003

7.1

Fiordland

Sep 04, 2010

7.1

Darfield (Christchurch)

Aug 02, 1942

7.0

Wairarapa

Feb 06, 1995

7.0

East Cape

Feb 12, 1893

6.9

Nelson

Dec 20, 2007

6.8

Gisborne

Earthquakes in bold occurred in the year beginning January 1 of those years in the Table 3
Source of Raw Data: GNS Science.

 

 

Appendix 6
MAJOR QUAKES IN SOUTH EAST FRANCE 1750-2000

ALPES DU NORD

Savoie

11/03/1817    Mont-Blanc     VII

19/02/1822    Chautagne      VIII

11/08/1839    Annecy         VII

08/10/1877    Faucigny       VII

30/12/1879    Chablais       VII

22/07/1881    Belledonne     VII

29/04/1905    Aig.-Rouges    VIII

13/08/1905    Glac. du Tour  VII

17/04/1936    Vuache         VII

30/03/1958    Chautagne      VII

19/08/1968    Chablais       VII

15/07/1996    Annecy         VII-VIII


Dauphiné
25/04/1962    Vercors        VII-VIII

25/04/1963    Vercors        VII

27/04/1963    Vercors        VII

 

Sud-ouest de la Suisse

19/09/1754    Lac Léman      VII

09/12/1755    Valais         VIII

24/01/1837    Valais         VII

25/07/1855    Valais         VIII-IX

26/07/1855    Valais         VIII

26/07/1855    Valais         VII-VIII

28/10/1855    Valais         VII

01/12/1874    Valais         VII

04/07/1880    Valais         VII

25/11/1881    Lac Léman      VII

25/08/1915    Valais         VII

15/04/1924    Valais         VII

25/01/1946    Valais         VIII

30/05/1946    Valais         VII

19/05/1954    Valais         VII


ALPES DU SUD


Queyras et Ubaye

27/11/1884    Queyras        VII

12/07/1904    Queyras        VII

19/03/1935    Embrunais      VIII

18/07/1938    Queyras        VII

05/04/1959    Haute-Ubaye    VIII


Vesubie

none

Provence

18/11/1769    Comtat         VII

21/12/1769    Venaissin      VII

20/03/1812    Durance        VII-VIII

26/03/1812    Durance        VII

12/12/1855    Haut-Verdon    VIII

09/06/1863    Région de Digne      VII

19/05/1866    Durance        VII

10/04/1905    Ventoux        VII

11/06/1909    Trévaresse     IX

14/05/1913    Durance        VII-VIII

24/07/1927    Ventoux        VII

30/11/1951    Haut-Verdon    VIII

08/06/1952    Ventoux        VII


ITALIE


Ligurie

23/02/1818    Ligurie        VIII

26/05/1831    Ligurie        VIII-IX

29/12/1854    Ligurie        VII-VIII

23/02/1887    Ligurie        X


Piémont

09/03/1753    Val Chisone    VII

26/05/1767    Lanzo          VIII

02/04/1808    Val Pellice    VIII

02/04/1808    Val Pellice    VII

16/04/1808    Val Pellice    VII

25/10/1858    Val Chisone    VII

17/02/1947    Val Chisone    VIII

05/01/1980    Pinerolo       VII

 

COULOIR RHODANIEN

23/01/1773    Tricastin      VII-VIII

14/07/1873    Tricastin      VII

19/07/1873    Tricastin      VII-VIII

08/08/1873    Tricastin      VII-VIII

13/05/1901    Drôme          VII

12/05/1934    Tricastin      VII

30/09/1946    Cévennes       VII


CORSE

22/10/1775    Corse occidentale   VII

 

 

The years in bold experienced major earthquakes in the year commencing March 1 of those years in Appendix 7.
Information given – Date, Region and Intensity.

Source: SISMALP - French Alps Seismic Network.

 

 

Appendix 7
9/56 YEAR CYCLE:
QUAKES IN SOUTH EAST FRANCE 1750-2000
Year beginning March 1

Sq
52

Sq
05

Sq
14

Sq
23

Sq
32

Sq
41

Sq
50

 

 

 

 

 

 

1754
Sep19

1756

1765

1774

1783

1792

1801

1810

1812
Mar20
Mar26

1821
1822
Feb19

1830

1839
Aug11

1848

1857

1866
May19

1868

1877
Oct08

1886
1887
Feb23

1895

1904
Jul12

1913
May14

1922

1924
Apr15

1933

1942

1951
Nov30

1960

1969

1978

1980

1989

1998

2007

2016

 

 

 

Sq
03

Sq
12

Sq
21

Sq
30

Sq
39

Sq
48

Sq
01

 

 

 

 

 

1752

1761

1763

1772
1773
Jan23

1781

1790

1799

1808
Apr02
Apr02
Apr16

1817
Mar11
1818
Feb23