9/56 YEAR CYCLE: HURRICANES

David McMINN
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Reference for the original version of this paper.
McMinn, D. 2011, 9/56 Year Cycle: Hurricanes.
New Concepts In Global Tectonics Newsletter. No 59. p 105-111. June.

Abstract: The timing of major hurricanes in the Atlantic and the east Pacific was assessed in relation to the 9/56 year cycle. These important weather events tended to cluster within certain sections of the 9/56 year grid, far more than could be expected by chance. The raw hurricane data for the Atlantic was broken down into two eras 1851 – 1928 and 1929 –2009, while the 1949 – 2009 era was assessed for the eastern Pacific. Hurricanes could be correlated with the 9/56 year grid for all three periods. This hurricane cycle was hypothesised to arise from Moon Sun tidal effects, about which very little is known. What seemed most important were the ecliptic positions of the Moon, the Sun, the lunar ascending node (LAN) and apogee. This implied that the angles between these factors and the spring equinox point may offer clues as to how the 9/56 year hurricane effect actually functions.

Key words: 9/56 year, cycle, hurricane, Atlantic, Pacific, Moon, Sun

Introduction
A 9/56 year cycle has been established in patterns of US and Western European financial crises (McMinn, 1986, 1993 & 1995), which was then extrapolated to Californian earthquakes (McMinn, 2011a) and world record earthquakes (McMinn, 2011b). This paper examines the prospect of a 9/56 year cycle in the timing of hurricanes in both the Atlantic and the east Pacific. The raw hurricane data was sourced from unisys.com, which formed the basis of the assessment. Three periods were examined 1851 - 1928 and 1929 - 2009 for the Atlantic, as well as 1949 - 2009 for the east Pacific. These 9/56 year patterns were believed to arise from Moon Sun tidal harmonics as proposed by McMinn (2011a).

The 9/56 year cycle consists of a grid with intervals of 56 years vertically (called sequences) and 9 years horizontally (called subcycles), in which hurricanes tended to cluster into certain sectors. The 9/56 year effect was hypothesised to arise directly from Moon Sun tidal effects. Studies supporting a link between lunar phase and hurricane formation were undertaken from the mid 20th century onwards (Yaukey, 2009). Unfortunately, very little is known how Moon Sun cycles function in relation to the timing of extreme weather events, thus limiting the potential for accurate forecasting. Hopefully, this will become possible with major breakthroughs in scientific understanding.

Please read McMinn (Appendices 4 & 5, 2011a) for essential background information on lunisolar cycles and the various terms used in this paper.

The plane of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun is represented by the 360 degree ecliptic circle, with 00 E° being sited at the spring equinox point. The abbreviation E° was used to denote longitudinal degrees on the ecliptic and was equivalent to the angle made to the spring equinox point. The 56 year sequences have been numbered in accordance with McMinn (1995), with 1817, 1873, 1929 and 1985 being designated Sequence 01, 1818, 1874, 1930, 1986 as Sequence 02 and so forth. The full numbering has been presented by McMinn (Appendix 2, 2002).

Atlantic Hurricanes
1851 to 1928. The complete 9/56 year grid in Table 1 was divided into four quarter segments of 14 56 year sequences each. These quarter sectors have been labelled Grids A, B, C & D. Grid D contained 12 of the total 27 Category 4 & 5 events (marginally significant p < .05). Grids B & D were combined to give a total of 20 hurricanes (significant p < .01). The years in these two grids always had the LAN (as on July 1) sited between 055 and 145 E°, as well as between 235 and 325 E° with no exceptions. The two 90 degree segments for the LAN were 180 degrees opposite in the ecliptic circle.

Table 1
THE COMPLETE 9/56 YEAR CYCLE:
1851 – 1928 ATLANTIC HURRICANES Categories 4 & 5

Grid A

Sq
52

Sq
05

Sq
14

Sq
23

Sq
32

Sq
41

Sq
50

Sq
03

Sq
12

Sq
21

Sq
30

Sq
39

Sq
48

Sq
01

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1855

1864

1873

 

 

 

 

 

1857

1866

*

1875

1884

1893

*

1902

1911

1920

1929

1868

1877

1886

*

1895

1904

1913

1922

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1924

*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grid B

Sq
10

Sq
19

Sq
28

Sq
37

Sq

46

Sq
55

Sq
08

Sq
17

Sq
26

Sq
35

Sq
44

Sq
53

Sq
06

Sq

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1860

1869

1878
*

1887

 

 

1844

1853
*

1862

1871

1880
**

1889

1898
*

1907

1916

*

1925

 

 

1882
*

1891

1900
*

1909

1918

1927

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grid C

Sq
24

Sq
33

Sq
42

Sq
51

Sq
04

Sq
13

Sq
22

Sq
31

Sq
40

Sq
49

Sq

02

Sq
11

Sq
20

Sq
29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1856

*

1865

1874

1883

1892

1901

 

 

1858

1867

1876

1885

1894

*

1903

1912

1921

*

1930

1939

1948

1957

1896

1905

1914

1923

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grid D

Sq
38

Sq

47

Sq
56

Sq
09

Sq
18

Sq

27

Sq
36

Sq
45

Sq
54

Sq
07

Sq
16

Sq
25

Sq
34

Sq
43

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1850

1859

 

 

 

 

 

 

1852

1861

1870

1879

1888

1897

1906
*

1915
**

1854

1863

1872

1881

1890

1899
*

1908

1917

*

1926
****

1935

1944

1953

1962

1971

1910

*

1919

*

1928

*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years in bold contained at least one Category 4 or 5 hurricane.
* These years experienced at least one major hurricane.
Source of Raw Data: UNISYS  Atlantic Tropical Storm Tracking By Year.
http://weather.unisys.com/hurricane/atlantic/index.html

1929 to 2009. The complete 9/56 year grid was again divided into four quarter sectors each of 14 56 year sequences (see Table 2). Importantly, the Grids A, B, C & D in Table 1 very closely corresponded to Grids E, F, G & H respectively in Table 2. Amazingly, Grid E Table 2 contained 16 Category 5 events of a total 30 (significant p < .001). Additionally, Grid G experienced 31 Category 4 hurricanes, compared with a total figure of 78 (significant p < .01). Strangely, Category 5 hurricanes were most likely to happen in Grid E, whereas Category 4 events were most likely in Grid G. Some 69 Categories 4 & 5 weather extremes appeared in Grids E & G (significant p < .01).

Table 2
THE COMPLETE 9/56 YEAR CYCLE:
1929 – 2009 ATLANTIC HURRICANES
Categories 4 & 5

Grid E

Sq
43

Sq
52

Sq
05

Sq
14

Sq
23

Sq
32

Sq
41

Sq
50

Sq
03

Sq
12

Sq
21

Sq
30

Sq
39

Sq
48

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1931

1940

1949
##

1958
*
##

1967
*

1976

 

1924

1933
##

1942

1951
*
#

1960
**

1969
*

1978
##

1987

1996
##

2005
****
#

2014

 

 

1971
*

1980
*

1989
*
#

1998
*
#

2007
**

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grid F

 

Sq
10

Sq
19

Sq
28

Sq
37

Sq

46

Sq
55

Sq
08

Sq
17

Sq
26

Sq
35

Sq
44

Sq
53

Sq
06

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1934

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1936

1945
##

1954
#

1963
#

1972

1981
#

1990

1929
#

1938
*

1947
*

1956
#

1965
#

1974
#

1983

1992
*

2001
##

2010

2019

 

 

 

1985
#

1994

2003
*
#

2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grid G

Sq

15

Sq
24

Sq
33

Sq
42

Sq
51

Sq
04

Sq
13

Sq
22

Sq
31

Sq
40

Sq
49

Sq

02

Sq
11

Sq
20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1930
#

1939
#

1948
##

 

 

 

 

 

1932
*
##

1941

1950
*
##

1959

#

1968

1977
*

1986

1995
###

2004
*
###

1943
#

1952
#

1961
**
##

1970

1979
*
#

1988
*
##

1997

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

1999
####
#

2008
####

2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grid H

Sq
29

Sq
38

Sq

47

Sq
56

Sq
09

Sq
18

Sq

27

Sq
36

Sq
45

Sq
54

Sq
07

Sq
16

Sq
25

Sq
34

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1935
*

1944
#

1953
#

1962

 

 

 

 

1937

1946
#

1955
*
#

1964
####

1973

1982
#

1991
#

2000
##

2009
*##

2018

1957
##

1966
#

1975
#

1984
#

1993

2002
#

2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Denoted a Category 5 hurricane in a given year.
# Denoted a Category 4 hurricane in a given year.
Source of Raw Data:
UNISYS

During 1851 - 1928, Category 4 & 5 hurricanes recorded the lowest frequency in Grids A & C in Table 1. These grids very closely corresponded to Grids E & G respectively in Table 2, which contained the maximum frequency of Category 4 & 5 hurricanes for the 1929 – 2009 era. Why there was a major shift in hurricane patterns around the late 1920s remains completely unknown. (NB: 13 of the 14 56 year sequences in Grid A also showed up in Grid E, with the same situation applying to Grid C and Grid G.)

Importantly, years in Grids E & G in Table 2 always took place with the LAN (as on July 1) sited between 135 and 215 E°, as well as between 325 and 045 E°.    

East Pacific Hurricanes
1949 - 2009.  UNISYS presented raw data on east Pacific hurricanes for the post 1949 era, which was assessed for a 9/56 year effect (see Appendix 2). Most notably, 40 major Categories 4 & 5 hurricanes occurred in Grid K of a total 109 (significant p < .01).   


Discussion

Moon Sun cycles are hypothesized to activate the 9/56 year cycle in the timing of major hurricanes over the past 160 years. Any event that clusters within the 9/56 year grid will correlate perfectly with Moon Sun cycles. Any events in the same 56 year sequence will have the LAn sited in one narrow sector of the ecliptic circle with no exceptions. Any event grouping within the 9/56 year grid will always have the LAN located in two segments approximately 180 degrees apart on the ecliptic circle WITH NO EXCEPTIONS. The apogee point will also be sited in three segments of the ecliptic 120 degrees apart WITH NO EXCEPTIONS (see Appendices 4 & 5, McMinn, 2011). This was a property of the 9/56 year grid generally. Both the LAN and apogee point can be intimately linked to Moon Sun tidal effects on the Earth’s surface.

 

This work stresses the importance of studying cycles generally and looking at possible links between cycles established for various phenomena. The 9/56 year cycle was first determined from financial trends, then earthquakes and now hurricanes. It would be very unlikely that a 9/56 year cycle would have ever have been determined in seismic or hurricane activity without the input from market studies.

 

A key question must be asked whether the lunisolar cycles can be correlated with the landfall of hurricanes. The crossing onto land is probably the most important event possible in the life of a hurricane and it definitely has a major impact on humans. Although very speculative, it would still make an interesting study to test the validity of this hypothesis. Virtually nothing is known about how the 9/56 year Moon Sun effect actually functions, a situation that can only be rectified by further advances in research.

 

According to Yaukey (2009), “Atlantic best-track observations from 1950-2007 displayed a pronounced peak of both hurricane occurrence and mean cyclone wind speed half way between the new and full moon.” Additionally, the rapid intensification of hurricane development was “concentrated around the new moon, with a lesser concentration around the full moonSuch approaches are very useful, but only consider one lunisolar factor in relation to severe weather events. A superior evaluation would be to appraise several Moon Sun influences simultaneously – the Moon, the Sun, the LAN, apogee point and the spring equinox point. This could be far more relevant to the timing of extreme hurricanes. Diurnal cycles may also be important, although this cannot be supported by any evidence.

There has been a general increase in the frequency and intensity of hurricane activity in North America over the past century due to global warming. Until 1924, no Category 5 hurricanes were recorded in the Atlantic based on unisys.com data, but during the 2000's 8 were experienced. Even so, this long term trend should not distort the 9/56 year findings in any meaningful way.  

Conclusions
Category 4 & 5 hurricanes occurred preferentially in quarter sectors of the complete 9/56 year grid for the three time frames assessed - 1851 - 1928 (Atlantic Ocean), 1929 - 2009 (Atlantic Ocean) and 1949 - 2009 (east Pacific). For the 1851 – 1928 period, the minimum hurricane frequency occurred in Grids A & C (see Table 1). These very closely approximate to Grids E & G in Table 2, which contained the maximum hurricane frequency from 1929 to 2009. The shift in hurricane cycles around the 1920’s was unusual and cannot be explained.

For the 1929 - 2009 period, Category 5 Atlantic hurricanes most likely to happen in Grid E while Category 4 hurricanes occurred selectively in Grid G. East Pacific hurricanes also produced significance as they tended to occur preferentially in one quarter (Grid K) of the 9/56 year grid (significance p < .01) (see Table 3).

 

Table 3
SUMMARY OF FINDINGS FOR HURRICANES

Era

Total Number

Grids

Number

Significant

Atlantic

 

 

 

 

1851-1928

27 Cat 4 & 5

Grid D

12

p < .05

 

 

Grids B & D

20

p < .01

1929-2009

30 Cat 5

Grid E

16

p < .001

 

78 Cat 4

Grid G

31

p < .01

 

109 Cat 4 & 5

Grids E & G

69

p < .01

 

 

 

 

 

East Pacific

 

 

 

 

1949-2009

109 Cat 4 & 5

Grid K

40

p < .01

 


A 9/56 year cycle was apparent in the frequency of hurricane formation and was probably due to Moon Sun tidal influences about which little is known. Nothing much more can be stated. A few good correlates do not make a theory and further research is warranted before a 9/56 year hurricane effect can be fully substantiated. 


References
Funk, J M. 1932. The 56 Year Cycle in American Business Activity. Ottawa, IL.
McMinn, D. 1986. The 56 Year Cycles & Financial Crises. 15th Conference of Economists. Monash University. The Economic Society of Australia. 25-29 August.
McMinn, D. 1993. Financial Crises & The Number 56.
The Australian Technical Analyst Association Newsletter. p 21. September.
McMinn, D. 1995. Financial Crises & The 56 Year Cycle. Twin Palms Publishing. 
McMinn, D., 2002. 9/56 Year Cycle: Financial Crises.
www.davidmcminn.com/pages/fcnum56.htm
McMinn, D. 2004. Market Timing By The Number 56. Twin Palms Publishing.
McMinn,
D. 2011a. 9/56 Year Cycle: Californian Earthquakes. New Concepts In Global Tectonics Newsletter. No 58. p 33-44. March.
UNISYS Atlantic Tropical Storm Tracking By Year. http://weather.unisys.com/hurricane/atlantic/index.html.
UNISYS. East Pacific Tropical Storm Tracking By Year.
http://weather.unisys.com/hurricane/e_pacific.html

Yaukey, P. 2009. Hurricane Rapid Growth Events & The Lunar Synodic Cycle. Paper presented at Hurricanes III Climate Dynamics & Biotic Response. Association of American Geographers. 2009 Annual General Meeting. Las Vegas, Nevada. March.

 



Appendix 1
ATLANTIC HURRICANES 1851 – 2009

 

ATLANTIC HURRICANES: 1851 – 1928 Categories 4 & 5

 

Year

Active

Rank
(a)

Cat

Year

Active

Rank (a)

Cat

 

1853

Aug 30 – Sep 10

3

4

1915

Aug 05 – Aug 23
Sep 20 – Oct 01

2
6

4
4

 

1856

Aug 19 – Sep 12

1

4

 

1866

Sep 24 – Oct 05

6

4

1916

Aug 12 – Aug 20

6

4

 

1878

Sep 24 – Oct 08

7

4

1917

Sep 20 - Sep 30

4

4

 

1880

Aug 04 – Aug 14
Sep 27 – Oct 04

2
8

4
4

1919

Sep 02 – Sep 16

2

4

1921

Oct 20 – Oct 30

6

4

1882

Oct 05 – Oct 15

6

4

1924

Oct 14 – Oct 23

10

5

1886

Aug 12 – Aug 21

5

4

1926

 

Jul 22 – Aug 02
Sep 02 – Sep 24
Sep 11 – Sep 22 Oct 14 – Oct 24

1
4
6
10

4
4
4
4

 

1893

Sep 27 – Oct 05

10

4

 

1894

Oct 11 – Oct 20

6

4

 

1898

Sep 25 – Oct 06

7

4

1899

Aug 03 – Sep 04

3

4

1928

Sep 06 – Sep 20

4

5

 

1900

Aug 27 – Sep 15

1

4

 

 

 

 

 

1906

Aug 25 – Sep 12

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

1910

Oct 09 – Oct 23

5

4

 

 

 

 

 

ATLANTIC HURRICANES: 1929 – 2009 Categories 4 & 5

 

1929

Sep 22 – Oct 04

2

4

1979

Aug 25 – Sep 08
Aug 29 - Sep 15

4
6

5
4

 

1930

Aug 31 – Sep 17

2

4

 

1932

 

Aug 12 – Aug 15 Aug 30 – Sep 13 Oct 30 – Nov 14

2
4
10

4
5
4

1980

Jul 31 – Aug 11

1

5

 

1981

Sep 11 - Sep 20

8

4

 

1982

Sep 13 - Sep 20

5

4

 

1933

Aug 31 – Sep 07 Oct 01 – Oct 09

12
18

4
4

1984

Sep 08 - Sep 16

5

4

 

1985

Sep 16 - Oct 02

7

4

 

1935

Aug 29 – Sep 10

2

5

1988

Sep 08 – Sep 20
Sep 19 - Sep 30
Oct 10 - Oct 23

8
9
11

5
4
4

 

1938

Sep 10 – Sep 22

4

5

 

1939

Oct 12 – Oct 18

4

4

 

1943

Aug 19 – Aug 27

3

4

1989

Aug 30 - Sep 13 Sep 10 – Sep 25

7

8

4
5

 

1944

Sep 09 – Sep 16

7

4

 

1945

Aug 24 – Aug 29 Sep 12 – Sep 20

5
9

4
4

1991

Sep 04 - Sep 14

3

4

 

1992

Aug 16 – Aug 28

2

5

 

1946

Oct 05 – Oct 14

5

4

1995

 

 

Aug 08 - Aug 25

Aug 27 - Sep 12

Sep 27 - Oct 06

6

12

15

4

4

4

 

1947

Sep 04 – Sep 21

4

5

 

1948

Sep 04 – Sep 16
Oct 03 – Oct 16

6
8

4
4

1996

 

Aug 19 - Sep 06

Sep 08 - Sep 16

5

8

4

4

1949

Aug 23 – Aug 31 Sep 27 – Oct 06

2
10

4
4

1998

Sep 15 - Oct 01
Oct 22 – Nov 09

7
13

4
5

1950

 

Aug 12 – Aug 22
Aug 30 – Sep 17
Sep 08 – Sep 17

1
4
6

4
5
4

1999

 

 

 

 

Aug 18 - Aug 25

Aug 19 - Aug 31

Sep 07 - Sep 19

Sep 11 - Sep 23

Nov 13 - Nov 23

2

3

6

7

12

4

4

4

4

4

1951

Aug 12 – Aug 23 Sep 02 – Sep 13

3
5

4
5

1952

Oct 20 – Oct 28

7

4

 

1953

Aug 28 – Sep 09

4

4

2000

 

Sep 21 - Oct 04

Sep 28 - Oct 06

9

11

4

4

 

1954

Oct 05 – Oct 18

9

4

 

1955

Aug 03 – Aug 15 Sep 21 – Sep 30

2
10

4
5

2001

 

Oct 04 - Oct 09

Oct 29 - Nov 06

9

13

4

4

1956

Oct 30 – Nov 07

8

4

2002

Sep 21 - Oct 04

12

4

 

1957

Jun 25 – Jun 29 Sep 02 – Sep 24

2
4

4
4

2003

Aug 27 - Sep 09

Sep 06 - Sep 20

6

9

4

5

1958

Aug 11 – Aug 22
Sep 21 – Oct 04 Sep 24 – Sep 30

3
8
9

5
4
4

2004

Aug 09 - Aug 15

Aug 25 - Sep 10
Sep 02 – Sep 24

Sep 16 - Sep 28

3

6
9

11

4

4
5

4

1959

Sep 20 - Oct 02

8

4

 

1960

Aug 29 - Sep 14 Sep 14 – Sep 17

5
6

5
5

2005

Jul 04 - Jul 18
Jul 11 – Jul 21
Aug 23 – Aug 31 Sep 18 – Sep 26 Oct 15 – Oct 26

4
5
11
17
22

4
5
5
5
5

1961

Sep 02 - Sep 12
Sep 03 – Sep 16
Sep 10 - Sep 27

Oct 27 – Nov 01

2
3

5
9

4
5

4
5

2007

Aug 13 – Aug 23 Aug 31 – Sep 06

4
6

5
5

1963

Sep 26 - Oct 13

7

4

 

1964

 

 

 

Aug 20 - Sep 05

Aug 28 - Sep 16

Sep 13 - Sep 25

Sep 28 - Oct 05

5

6

9

10

4

4

4

4

2008

Aug 25 - Sep 05
Sep 01 - Sep 15 Oct 13 - Oct 21 Nov 05 - Nov 14

7
9
15
16

4
4
4
4

1965

Aug 27 - Sep 13

3

4

2009

Aug 15 – Aug 26

2

4

 

1966

Sep 21 - Oct 11

9

4

 

 

 

 

 

1967

Sep 05 – Sep 22

2

5

 

 

 

 

 

1969

Aug 14 – Aug 22

3

5

 

 

 

 

 

1971

Sep 05 – Sep 18

6

5

 

 

 

 

 

1974

Aug 29 - Sep 10

6

4

 

 

 

 

 

1975

Sep 22 - Oct 04

7

4

 

 

 

 

 

1977

Aug 29 – Sep 03

1

5

 

 

 

 

 

1978

 

Aug 30 - Sep 05

Sep 13 - Sep 20

6

8

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(a) In a given year, the first hurricane of the season is numbered 1, the second 2, the third 3, the fourth 4 and so forth.
Source of Raw Data:
UNISYS Atlantic Tropical Storm Tracking By Year.
http://weather.unisys.com/hurricane/atlantic/index.html

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 2
THE COMPLETE 9/56 YEAR CYCLE:
1949 – 2009 EAST PACIFIC HURRICANES
Categories 4 & 5

Grid I

Sq
41

Sq
50

Sq
03

Sq
12

Sq
21

Sq
30

Sq
39

Sq
48

Sq
01

Sq
10

Sq
19

Sq
28

Sq
37

Sq

46

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1956

1965

1974
#

 

 

 

 

1949

1958

1967
#

1976
####

1985
###

1994
**##
#

2003

2012

 

 

1969

1978
####
#

1987
##

1996
#

2005
#

2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grid J

Sq
55

Sq
08

Sq
17

Sq
26

Sq
35

Sq
44

Sq
53

Sq
06

Sq

15

Sq
24

Sq
33

Sq
42

Sq
51

Sq
04

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1952

1961

1970

1979
##

1988
##

 

 

 

1954

1963

1972
#

1981

1990
####

1999
#

2008
#

2017

 

 

 

1983
####
#

1992
####
###

2001
##

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grid K

Sq
13

Sq
22

Sq
31

Sq
40

Sq
49

Sq

02

Sq
11

Sq
20

Sq
29

Sq
38

Sq

47

Sq
56

Sq
09

Sq
18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1957
#

1966

1975
##

1984
####

1993
####
###

2002
***#

 

1950

1959
**#

1968

1977

1986
###

1995
###

2004
##

2013

 

 

 

 

 

1997
****
####

2006
###

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grid L

Sq

27

Sq
36

Sq
45

Sq
54

Sq
07

Sq
16

Sq
25

Sq
34

Sq
43

Sq
52

Sq
05

Sq
14

Sq
23

Sq
32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1951

1960

 

 

 

 

 

 

1953

1962

1971
#

1980
#

1989
##

1998
###

2007
#

 

1955

1964

1973
*##

1982
#

1991
##

2000
#

2009
*##

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Denotes a Category 5 hurricane.
# Denotes a Category 4 hurricane.
Source of Raw Data:
UNISYS